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Brainerd police seek public's help in attempted abduction

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The Brainerd Police Department is asking for the public's help with any information leading to a possible suspect who allegedly attempted to abduct a girl Friday, Oct. 5, in northeast Brainerd.

The police department was called at 4:09 p.m. after 12- and 13-year-old girls reported an unknown man attempted to abduct one of them as they were walking in an alleyway in the area of the 500 block of First and Second avenues in northeast Brainerd, Brainerd Police Sgt. John Davis said.

The girls stated the man spoke with them a few times and then physically tried to grab one of them. The girls were able to get away and the man fled.

The suspect is described as a white man in his 20s with brown hair and a slender build. He is 5 feet, 8 inches tall and was driving a red, four-door car.

"We would very much appreciate the public's help if anyone saw anything out of the ordinary in the area around that time near the area near Evergreen Drive by the cemetery," Davis said. "We would like to speak with (this man)."

Calls can be made to the Brainerd Police Department at 218-829-2805.

Police said this incident is atypical.

"Fortunately we don't have reports such as this too routinely," Davis said. "We don't think the public necessarily needs to be alarmed or feel like they have to take any other significant steps to safeguard themselves or their families other than, just the general practices they exercise every day."

General safety practices includes children should not talk to strangers; younger children should be accompanied by an adult; parents of older children, who are more independent, should know where their children are and when they are expected home.

Parents also should have conversations with their children to be mindful of their surroundings. As children become more independent it is safer for them to travel in number with their friends when out in public and to stay in well-lit and well-populated areas, Davis said.

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