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Nisswa native serves aboard Navy’s most-advanced attack submarine

Petty Officer 3rd Class Cadel Roeder works as a sonar technician (submarine) serving aboard the Pearl Harbor-based submarine, one of 56 fast attack submarines in the U.S. Navy. Photo By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jesse Hawthorne

PEARL HARBOR – Nisswa native and 2014 Pequot Lakes High School graduate, Cadel Roeder, is serving in the U.S. Navy aboard one of the Navy’s newest attack submarines, USS Hawaii.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Roeder works as a sonar technician (submarine) serving aboard the Pearl Harbor-based submarine, one of 56 fast attack submarines in the U.S. Navy.

A Navy sonar technician (submarine) is responsible for operating the sonar systems to detect underwater contacts and help navigate the ship.

“Growing up, I learned no matter what the task is, if you finish it correctly you don't have to redo the job,” said Roeder.

Jobs are highly varied aboard the submarine, according to Navy officials. Approximately 130 men and women make up the submarine’s crew, doing everything from handling weapons to maintaining nuclear reactors.

"Our submarine teams are small, elite, and rely heavily on extraordinary individual performance," said Rear Adm. Daryl L. Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet. "It is no surprise that our sailors continue to set the standard for excellence, and the country continues to be well served by their service and sacrifice. I couldn't be more proud to lead this professional fighting force."

Roeder also has military ties with family members who have previously served and is honored to carry on the family tradition.

“My brother was in the Army, my father in the National Guard, and my granddad was in the Army Air Corps,” said Roeder. “All three of them had influence on my decision to join the military. I feel like it is a family tradition to serve.”

Challenging submarine living conditions build strong fellowship among the elite crew, Navy officials explained. The crews are highly motivated, and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches and drills.

“Serving in the Navy means giving something to the country,” said Roeder. “It means doing whatever I can to serve the United States.”

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By Kayla Turnbow, Navy Office of Community Outreach

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